Are comic book dying?

Comics won't die, but the niche they occupy has shrunk a lot and they'll have to be reduced to match it or find a different format. Comics (manga, graphic novel, sequential art) will never die.

Are comic book dying?

Comics won't die, but the niche they occupy has shrunk a lot and they'll have to be reduced to match it or find a different format. Comics (manga, graphic novel, sequential art) will never die. Distribution methods have changed and will change, but that's normal. We need to put all of this into perspective.

When local independent comic book stores opened, there were still comics on the supermarket checkout line. The return of Saturday morning cartoons, weekday afternoon cartoons, and weekday morning cartoons, all with strong comic book promotion during commercials. The comic book industry has been creating characters that please some kind of group that fails miserably. Mangas, obviously, are comics, so it seems strange to say that you're returning to them now when it seems like you've been reading comics all the time.

Serialized superhero storytelling used to go beyond the television budget, and now that television (and movies) can tell the same stories, audiences move away from comics. Recently, I found this section one of the most interesting books, perhaps because the notion of comics diversified with respect to what I see mentioned here. If we look at last year's sales figures, I imagine that there are between 200,000 and 250,000 comic book readers who keep the industry supported. Massey clearly considers “classic comics” as the preferred format, with the TPB collections as alternatives, but for her, the price of floppy disks is becoming prohibitive.

You may not remember this obscure gadget called Walk-Man, but people who know it have told me that it had a big effect on the way people spent their free time that they would otherwise have spent with their faces buried in newspapers, print magazines and comics. Comparing the indirect but pervasive threat of a virus outbreak (with restrictive measures that apply to all non-essential industries) with the direct and specific threat of a congressional hearing (resulting in restrictive measures aimed directly at the American comic book industry) may be proof of the author looking for any “previously conquered threat” without once again checking if it is applicable to the current situation. Another problem is that American comics were in a state of stopped development for decades thanks to the monopolistic (or duopolistic) practices of Comics Code, DC and Marvel and several economic developments. In the 1980s, the comic book industry experienced a sharp increase in revenues due to the increase in the popularity of superheroes.

But I sympathize with well-meaning comic book fans who don't know how to process the shocks that COVID-19 caused across the industry.

Will Isidro
Will Isidro

Typical thinker. Hardcore travel specialist. Incurable twitter fanatic. Total pop culture fanatic. Hipster-friendly tea buff.