Do comic books still exist?

Today, 90% of all comics are still sold in independent retail stores, and kiosks and digital services such as Amazon Kindle represent only one digit. Even so, the comic book industry's new success isn't as simple as it seems.

Do comic books still exist?

Today, 90% of all comics are still sold in independent retail stores, and kiosks and digital services such as Amazon Kindle represent only one digit. Even so, the comic book industry's new success isn't as simple as it seems. While the industry isn't dead at all, the current revival owes much of its success to an entirely different genre. Here is a more detailed analysis of how comics have evolved and reached new levels of success over the past few years, as well as an analysis of the factors that have contributed to this phenomenon.

Dimensioning the comic book market has become a complicated process. After comic books disappeared from newsstands in the early 1980s, almost all periodic comics were sold through a network of independently owned retail comic book stores. The comics are distributed through a single company, Diamond, in an agreement known as a “direct market”. Because this inventory cannot be returned, the number of copies ordered and sent to comic book stores is counted as sales, even if they are not sold to retail customers.

By the 1980s, several independent publishers, such as Pacific, Eclipse, First, Comico and Fantagrahics, had begun to publish a wide range of styles and formats, from color superhero comics, detectives and science fiction to black-and-white stories about Latin American magical realism in magazine format. Published and distributed regardless of the established comic book industry, most of these comics reflected the youth counterculture and drug culture of the time. Periodical publications of protocomics began to appear in the early 20th century, and the first standard size comic was Funnies on Parade. It has been said that the 13th century Cantigas de Santa María could be considered the first Spanish comic book, although comics (also known in Spain as comics or comics) debuted around 1857.Sales of a single issue in comic book stores still dominate, but both in individual numbers such as format and comics, stores and channels represent a much smaller and smaller share of the global market than in previous years.

With the closure of its main distributor, DC Comics, the second largest comic book publisher in North America, responded by parting ways with Diamond after a quarter of a century of business together. The comics are showcased at Collector's Corner in Auburn, as store owner John Mullins watches on Monday. As a result, the comic book collector market has re-emerged seeking to capitalize on the success of these recent films. The first issue of a full-length comic book series is usually the rarest and most attractive to collectors.

While all of this seems to point to huge profits for the comic book industry, it would be wise to take these upbeat stories with an enormous grain of salt. Over the years, Diamond bought smaller and rival distributors to achieve a virtual monopoly on comic book distribution since the mid-90s. With comics like Maus being banned in different school districts, this is likely to lead readers to seek them out even more. As sectors of the American entertainment industry close in crisis, new comics continue to be published and printed weekly, bringing new stories to readers even in isolation in their homes.

Nearly twenty years later, the event is still going on, as is the comic book industry it helped save. Although the articles referenced attribute the recent success of superhero comics to their film adaptation, neither of them attributes too substantial growth to popular books. And dozens of artists and writers auction off books and works of art to benefit others; DC artist Jim Lee draws a list of superheroes every day for two months and sells it by the thousands on eBay to benefit comic book stores. .

Will Isidro
Will Isidro

Typical thinker. Hardcore travel specialist. Incurable twitter fanatic. Total pop culture fanatic. Hipster-friendly tea buff.