When did comics stop being popular?

In the late 1940s, the popularity of superhero comics declined. To maintain readers' interest, comic book publishers diversified into other genres, such as war, western, science fiction, romance, crime and terror.

When did comics stop being popular?

In the late 1940s, the popularity of superhero comics declined. To maintain readers' interest, comic book publishers diversified into other genres, such as war, western, science fiction, romance, crime and terror. Many superhero titles were canceled or converted to other genres. While this epic series, the first modern “events” comic, is in many ways a bustling and expansive superhero adventure, it also features the shocking deaths of beloved Silver Age characters, Flash and Supergirl, and its artificial clarification of the continuity of DC's entire line of comics laid the foundation for the revisionist comics by Moore, Miller and others.

Superhero movies are certainly thriving, but those 10- and 11-figure movie franchises are based on comics that used to cost a penny. Comic book culture is now an all-encompassing amalgam of passionate fans of the world with varying degrees of fanaticism. At a time when most Americans didn't want anything to do with another war in Europe, comic book characters did. For years, the self-mockery of West, Burt Ward and several guest stars of the 1960s Batman show defined superheroes in the popular imagination, much to the chagrin of superhero comic book readers.

The Batman of the '60s, after all, came in the midst of the pop art movement that placed comics at the center of their reevaluations of commercial culture. Wonder Woman did her part by fitting the stereotypes of the time, although she worked as a nurse in World War II, unlike some of the comic book covers recorded today. Comics also became popular because of other virtues during the 1930s, when the Great Depression was going through. The grim and stark turn of the mid-1980s, perhaps more than anything else, can be understood as a refutation of the overwhelming influence that the series had on the general perception of comics and superheroes of the time.

Only one company, Diamond, founded in 1982, distributed almost all the comics from publishers large and small to retail stores across the country in what became known as the “direct market system”. Swamp Thing, a hybrid of the horror and superhero genre, was the first monthly comic by a major publisher to relinquish the approval of the Comics Code. Planet Krypton's tacky decor includes displays of costumes and artifacts from old comics, as well as posters that reproduce classic comic book covers from the Golden and Silver Age painted by Alex Ross in the style of cartoon originals. If you're looking for something more direct than giant top-of-the-line stocks, an investment platform called Otis Funds has a fund that invests in collectibles such as art, video games, trading cards, sneakers and, you guessed it, comics.

Will Isidro
Will Isidro

Typical thinker. Hardcore travel specialist. Incurable twitter fanatic. Total pop culture fanatic. Hipster-friendly tea buff.