Why are comic books called graphic novels?

A graphic novel, as its name suggests, is a novel that tells a complete story through illustrations. A graphic novel contains a beginning, a middle and an end.

Why are comic books called graphic novels?

A graphic novel, as its name suggests, is a novel that tells a complete story through illustrations. A graphic novel contains a beginning, a middle and an end. A graphic novel will offer the kind of resolution you expect from a novel, even if it is part of a series. They are produced monthly and usually have a good amount of action that moves the story forward to the next issue.

Graphic novels read like a book. They delve into the plot lines of the characters and the story, not just the action, and complete the entire arc of a narrative at the end of the novel. However, the difference isn't that big, except that with a graphic novel it's much easier to remember my new details of the story because with a comic you have to wait months and months for a story to work out and you might forget some things here and there. The first comics date back to the 1920s, when newspaper strips containing comics were collected and reprinted.

Starting in the 1970s, when the field of comic book studies first emerged as an academic discipline, academics and others have tried to define the word comics and generate appropriate critical terminology to support that definition. So I have the original Charles Schults comics, you can read the comics as short stories, so graphic novels are stories. My impression is that comics are more drawings that tell the story with added text (you could almost understand the story without the text), while graphic novels are more revealing in writing, but with a lot of images to make everything more fun and accessible, but you can't necessarily understand the story of images. Many enthusiasts use binding as a determining factor in determining if something is classified as a graphic novel or comic book.

Some popular comics include Batman, The Incredible Hulk, Superman, The X-men, Wonder Woman and The Fantastic Four. After telling people that I read graphic novels, a common response is: “I didn't know you liked comics. Comics are serialized stories; most are relatively short and tell the story of the book's heroes and heroines over a long period of time. Ironically, comics have long had their own stigma of being a childish pleasure, immature and guilty at best.

The length of the graphic novel allows it to present stories of greater complexity and depth than a comic book. In 1964, a comic book fan named Richard Kyle used the terms graphic story and graphic novel in an article about the future of the comic book medium for a self-published fanzine or fan magazine. So what's the real difference between comics and graphic novels? Are these terms interchangeable or does each have identifying characteristics? Comics are, of course, recognizable as regularly published periodicals that feature sequential works of art. Comics don't focus entirely on action, and Japanese comics, especially, have very long exposure panels and moments by moments.

Will Isidro
Will Isidro

Typical thinker. Hardcore travel specialist. Incurable twitter fanatic. Total pop culture fanatic. Hipster-friendly tea buff.